How to Clean a Ceiling Fan

Ceiling fans are a great home accessory to create a breeze to keep rooms comfortable and add an attractive look to any living spaces. But, how do you clean a ceiling fan without making a bigger mess? The most common issue is dealing with all that dust! In the kitchen, how do you clean a greasy kitchen ceiling fan? And what about the fan attached to that super high ceiling?

Ceiling fan dirt is more than just a cosmetic issue. It can cause problems like noisy fan operation and even damage to the motor. If anyone in the house has allergies or respiratory illnesses, dust can make matters worse.

Here are a few hacks to help you clean a ceiling fan and eliminate dust, dirt and all the problems that come with it. With these tips, you can clean your ceiling fan in less time and with less hassle. Plus, when guests come over, you won’t have to hope they don’t look up!

Here are some great tips and strategies to clean ceiling fans Image shows a man trying to clean a ceiling fan with a clothwith ease:

  • Turn off your fan and make sure the blades aren’t moving.
  • Clean the motor unit and pull chains with a clean cloth.
  • Clean the fan blades using a pole duster that cleans the top and bottom of each blade at the same time.
  • If you want a deeper clean, climb up a step ladder and clean the blades by-hand. Use a lightly damp microfiber cloth and dry and finish with a dry cloth.
  • Avoid putting too much pressure on the blades as you clean to prevent breaking or damaging.
  • You can go over each clean blade with an unused dryer sheet. This may allow you to go longer between cleanings because the dust won’t cling to the blades.

Have you ever heard of the pillowcase method? You can prevent the typical dust storm that ensues from the ceiling when you clean the fan by using a pillowcase! Put a clean pillowcase around the fan blades and slide the case down the blade. You will remove the dust and keep it contained inside the pillowcase.  When you’re done, take the pillowcase outside and turn it inside to shake clumps of dust off before washing it.

Another messy situation is cleaning a greasy ceiling fan.

A kitchen ceiling fan attracts grease. And the combination of grease and dust results in a grimy, sticky residue on the blades that can be difficult to remove. Take the steps to clean your kitchen ceiling fan.

  • Wipe individual blades with dry paper towels to remove loose debris.
  • Follow up with a damp microfiber cloth to remove the layer of sticky grime.
  • Continue this process to remove the layers of grease buildup.
  • Put a small amount of a de-greasing household cleaner on a microfiber cloth and scrub if the blades are really gunky.
  • Follow with a clean, dry cloth until clean to the touch.

For extra high ceilings, get a tall ladder or an extension duster to reach the blades. The pillowcase method is also effective!

If your ceiling fan blades are textured or covered in fabric take extra care.  Keep them dust-free by using a handheld vacuum attachment to remove dust and debris. Follow with a water-moistened microfiber cloth to clean tough grime.

If you’re looking to install some new ceiling fans in your home, contact the pros at Central Carolina Air Conditioning, Plumbing, & Electrical at 800.461.3010.

HVAC Upgrades for Comfort & Equity

HVAC upgrades will always be a safe bet and a smart investment — and yet, these home improvements are some of the most commonly overlooked by homeowners and flippers. A prospective buyer probably won’t automatically walk away from a home without all the newest gadgets, but they won’t even look twice at a home that lacks basic heating and cooling abilities.

Therefore, you should take HVAC renovations quite seriously and make them a priority over new flooring, paint, and other aesthetic or luxury upgrades.

The National Association of Realtors (NAR) reports that HVAC remodels have a higher average return on investment than most other types of remodeling projects, yielding a return of up to 71%.

You’ll want to take into account the region, the age and size of your home, your budget, and the layout of your property. With these factors in mind, you can get an idea of your HVAC system upgrade options.

Is your current HVAC system in good working condition?

During the home-selling process, you can bet that people will ask you the age of your HVAC system. Was your system installed less than 10 years ago? If so,then it very likely has several good years of use left in it. Anything newer isn’t likely to make a difference in home value or offers from potential buyers. Anything older than 15 years old; however, will be a turnoff to buyers.

Can you get away with an HVAC repair instead of a replacement?

If your HVAC unit is less than 10 years old but functions like it needs to be upgraded, you might be able to get away with some simple repairs rather than a complete system overhaul.

It’s hard to go wrong with most basic HVAC upgrades. This is especially true if the home you’re renovating is more than 20 years old. Even though you may only recover 50% or less of certain HVAC investments, an upgrade could capture the interest of buyers and make it worth the purchase.

Furnace/Boiler

Replacing an old furnace or boiler is an easy upgrade that doesn’t require much labor. Most furnaces can last up to 15 years with proper maintenance, but most older heating appliances require frequent, pricey repairs and cost a lot to run. By switching to a new heating appliance, you conserve energy and improve the efficiency of your home’s heating system. This is attractive to potential buyers.

Insulation

Fiberglass insulation only costs around $1,200 on average and yields a $1,400 return upon resale within a year of completion. Poor insulation is an easy fix and a low-risk investment that yields a 95% to 116% return. Properly insulated walls improve a home’s ability to regulate internal temperatures and reduce the demand on its HVAC system.

Air DuctsImage shows new ductwork installed to add equity to a home

If you are replacing an old HVAC system with a more efficient one, you might need to upgrade your ductwork to accommodate it. Ductwork is made to last 25 years at the most, but it starts to degrade in about 15 years. Deterioration will reduce the efficiency of an HVAC system significantly. It’s a good idea to replace the ductwork if you plan to sell your home in the near future.

Windows

Approximately 35% of a home’s heat escapes through low-quality windows. Even if the walls of your home are highly insulated, it won’t do much good if the windows aren’t equally energy-efficient.

Doors and Weather Stripping

Another way to significantly improve your HVAC efficiency with minimal labor is to upgrade to energy-efficient doors and repair or replace any old weather stripping. Some of the most energy-efficient materials available for residential doors include fiberglass, steel, and vinyl. Try to avoid wood and glass if your goal is to prevent airflow.

After replacing your door, you should see a return of 75% to 91% of your investment upon resale, depending on the type of door you’ve chosen. When swapping out your door, don’t forget about the weather stripping. New weather stripping will ensure a tight seal around your doors and windows and prevent air leaks. This is one of the cheapest upgrades you can make to your home, ranging from $130 to $340.

Central Air

People want to be comfortable in every room of their home all year long. Most homebuyers today consider central heating and air conditioning a standard feature rather than an upgrade. So,without it, you may struggle to sell your home. A central air installation can cost anywhere from $6,000 to 15,000, but it could increase your home value by up to 10%.

Roof

While the roof serves to protect everything under it, it’s also an important insulator. Inefficient roofing materials account for 25% of heat loss. Just by upgrading to modern, high-tech shingles, you can relieve a lot of the strain on your HVAC system and improve your indoor comfort. Asphalt shingles can lower a roof’s surface temperature by up to 50 degrees and increase home value by $12,000. Investing in a new roof might seem like a big expense, but it has been shown that you can recover 105% of the cost at resale.

You can count on the professionals at Central Carolina Air Conditioning, Plumbing, and Electrical to help you maximize your HVAC upgrades. Call us at 800.461.3010 or submit our scheduling form, to get started.

 

Color Temperature In Your Home

There are so many options for lighting that it can seem like a challenging task when you’re trying to make decisions for your home. Do you need lighting that is cool, neutral, warm, or changeable? It depends on how and where you’re using them, what kind of look and feel you’re trying to create and personal preference. First, consider the color temperature scale.

What is Color Temperature?

You’ll find that most LED lighting products are offered in a variety of color temperatures – they vary hues of white. Correlated color temperature, or ‘CCT’ is a term you’ll see used to describe how warm (yellow) or cool (blue) the color of light in an LED bulb or fixture appears. It works like the sun, and is easiest to explain that way.

As the day progresses, the sun changes color. Midday might be 6000K (Kelvin), or very bright bluish-white. Sunset may be 3000K with an amber light. Usually, Kelvin temperatures for residential lighting are between 2500K and 5000K.

Here’s another way to look at it:

“Warm” light = anything 3000K or lower.

“Cool” light = 4000K or above.

“Neutral” looks cool or warm depending on surrounding furnishings and other lighting close by.

Some task lighting like in a basement workshop or home office can often be useful at 4000K and above.

And of course, the choice is ultimately up to you!

Kelvin temperature can also help you decide which fixture is right in a room:

Warm light, ambient lighting = 2200-2700K.

Soft white light = 3000-3500K.

Bright white light (for kitchens, offices, workspaces and vanities) = 4500K.

Other things to consider

Look at the colors of your ceiling, walls and floor. If your home has mostly cool colors like blacks, greys, blues, greens, and crisp whites the best choice is a cool LED color temperature such as 3000K or 3500K.

If your home has mostly natural materials like hardwood floors, wood cabinets and furniture, and colors like browns, reds, and oranges then warmer white LEDs is the best choice.

Temperature Recommendations by Space

Typically, lighting works best in certain rooms for which they are used.

  • Create an inviting living room to relax in and for entertaining. Using a dimmer sets the right atmosphere for TV watching and movie nights. Suggested color temperature: 2700-3000K
  • Lighting that’s a balance between being inviting, and bright enough to see what you’re eating is what you want in the dining room. Installing a dimmer helps adjust to the perfect mood. Suggested color temperature: 2700K – 3000K
  • Bedrooms are the most intimate space in your home. Keeping lights low and warm allows you to relax and rest. Suggested color temperature: 2700-3000K
  • Bathrooms are cooler and brighter so they are functional for routines like applying makeup and shaving. A more soothing environment can be achieved with a dimmer. Suggested color temperature: 3000-4000K
  • Bright light in the kitchen is ideal for prepping food and reading recipes. But kitchens are so versatile, so the color temperature can vary. Decide what’s best based on your decor and any other lighting being used nearby. A fail-proof ‘neutral’ 3000K white will look great no matter what. Suggested color temperature: 2700-4000K
  • You’ll need bright, task-oriented lighting in  the office or garage. Suggested color temperature: 3000-5000K

Ideally, our lighting would change throughout the day, just like the sun. We can try to emulate this process with LED “tunable” fixtures and using dimmers whenever possible. Dimming can transform a space and give you more functionality. It will also save energy and extend the life of your light bulbs.

If you need professional assistance while on your color temperature journey, call Central Carolina Air Conditioning, Plumbing, & Electrical at 800.461.3010.

Electrical Upgrades to Help Sell Your House

If you’re considering putting off upgrading the electrical in your home because you plan to put it on the market – think twice! It’s not a good idea to sell a home with questionable wiring and electrical. What should you replace? What can you leave for the buyer to fix? Let’s look at some electrical upgrades to help sell your house.

Electrical issues often deter potential buyers. Increasing your home’s curb appeal is always important. You need to see what’s behind the scenes that might send your potential buyer to another property. While you don’t want to spend a fortune on a home you’re selling, it is wise to learn when to update home wiring so you can get top dollar on your home sale.

These electrical upgrades will keep negotiations, price reductions/credits at a minimum, and above all, will help you get an offer near listing price.

Too Few Outlets

An outlet per room is not enough, and extension cords are dangerous. Each room should feature multiple outlets in convenient locations. For example, check for outlets next to the night stand, outside the front door, or in the bathroom.

Antiquated Electrical Delivery

Often, you’ll find that older homes are wired to receive 60-amps. Modern homes require 20-amps. If your home’s wiring is outdated, it will not support the number of electrical fixtures, appliances and electrical load for today’s homes.

Outdated Wiring

Wiring systems such as aluminum wiring, a leading cause of home fires, will have buyers and homeowner’s insurance companies running the other way. For safety and to manage the massive load of electronics in today’s homes, your whole home should have solid copper wire and adequate grounding.

Two-Prong (Ungrounded) Outlets

In today’s digital age, and for today’s home buyers, replace two-pronged plugs (and wiring). Outlets must be able to accept 3-prong plugs and be properly grounded. Buyers will not want to risk having their expensive gadgets getting fried.

Problematic Circuit Breaker Panels

All your home’s wiring should run through a circuit breaker panel. Any other type will stall the home sale, and affect the function and value of your home, and its insurability.

Missing GFCIsOutlets in the kitchen, bath, garage, basement, or other wet locations should be GFCI equipped

Water increases the risk of electric shock. Outlets in the kitchen, bath, garage, basement, or other wet locations should be GFCI equipped. GFCI outlets monitor electrical current. Therefore, when there is an imbalance, the outlet will disconnect power.

Now that you’ve assessed these electrical upgrades to help sell your house, do you need professional assistance? Contact Central Carolina Air Conditioning, Plumbing, & Electrical at 800.461.3010.

Save Money During the Pandemic

If you’ve noticed that your energy and electric bills have increased over the past few months, you’re not alone. We are spending more time at home and mixing work duties with home life. From running the dishwasher more often to using electronics longer hours, being at home nearly seven days a week is sucking up a lot of energy! Here are some strategies to help you save money during the pandemic.

Don’t open that oven door!

If you open the oven door while cooking, the temperature inside can drop by more than 10 degrees. Save energy and your oven baked goods by setting a timer and only checking the food when your timer goes off. If you cook once a day, or even once for a long period of time for multiple days, you can cut down your use of the stove and oven. Don’t put hot food into the fridge right away. Let it cool before putting them in the fridge so it doesn’t have to work as hard to cool the food down.

Get that laundry spinning.

Use the highest spin speed available on your washer to shorten the drying time and remove the most moisture. To make the dryer more efficient, clean the lint screen before every load to improve air circulation and wipe off the dryer sensor, especially if you use dryer sheets. This removes any film left over. If you have one, always use the sensor to tell when a load is dry. This is more efficient than setting a timer. Moisture sensors detect the laundry’s dryness and ends the cycle accordingly.

Don’t pre-rinse: let the dishwasher do the dishes.

Image shows woman loading a dishwasher

Skip pre-rinsing the dishes. You can save up to seven gallons of water a minute! The dishwasher uses just five gallons or less for a full cycle and many dishwashers come with a soil sensor that adjusts the cycle according to how dirty the dishes are.

Resist the urge to wash every time you have a few items to wash. Only start your dishwasher when you have a full load of dishes. If you place dishes and utensils according to the instructions in your owner’s manual, everything comes out clean in one wash so you don’t have to do it again. If you have a small household and don’t have enough dishes to run a full load after one or two meals, use the rinse and hold cycle. This will only use a couple gallons of water and will prevent food from getting caked on. When you accumulate a full load, run a full cycle. Soak pots and pans instead of rinsing them under running water.

Let the grass grow.

You don’t need to water your lawn a lot to keep it looking green and healthy. An established lawn needs only one inch of water per week during the growing season, including rain. Over-watering can actually harm your turf because the roots of the grass don’t grow deep. And too much water helps weeds grow.

If you keep your grass longer the taller blades of grass help shade the others, reducing evaporation and holding moisture instead. Don’t mow the lawn shorter than three inches. To do this, raise your lawn mower blade.

If you feel like your HVAC, plumbing, or electric systems aren’t as energy efficient as they should be, then complete our contact form or Central Carolina Air Conditioning, Plumbing, & Electrical at 800.461.3010. Our team of professionals can help you save money during the pandemic.

Plumbing Maintenance Guide

Summer is coming to an end and during a season transition it’s always a good idea to do some house maintenance to prepare for upcoming weather. Guarding against problems is easier and more cost effective than fixing them after they occur! Preparing your plumbing for fall and the months ahead is important – let’s look at this quick plumbing maintenance guide.

Clean the gutters around your home

Gutters become blocked in the summer and it’s common for leaves and branches to become trapped in them. In the

long term this will only become a larger problem when more leaves and branches fall in the coming months. Significant gutter clogs are a much bigger problem if they aren’t maintained, so it’s important to do some outdoor plumbing maintenance. Clearing your gutters at the end of summer lowers the chance you’ll end up with a clogged gutter in fall, or having water back up because it cannot drain from the roof properly.

Check and drain your water heater

So many other appliances depend on your water heater to function properly. As a result, your water heater must be in good working order to keep the rest of your home running smoothly. It’s also timely to drain your water heater, because there are a few hot summer days left and you can get by without hot water for a while.

  • Look for cracks or rust, wet spots and leaks. These are signs it’s time to call a plumber.
  • Also, if you find rust, leaks or cracks on the anode rods or pressure relief valves, immediately call a plumber.
  • Once you’ve inspected the water heater, drain the tank. This is an annual maintenance task and is done to flush out the sediment that may have built up over the year. Sediment build up can damage the inside of your unit,

    making a loud popping sound.

Check your all your fixtures, appliances and pipes

  • Even the smallest of leaks can waste gallons of water every year. Anything that holds or moves water needs to be checked.

The sink

  • Visually check underneath your sinks. Do you see evidence of water? Is there a sign of past water damage? Try running the water for a few seconds. When you turn it off, check the pipes below. If you see water dripping around them you may have a leak. If you are unsure if it’s serious, check with your plumbing professional.

The toilet

  • Toilets create many household leaks. They can be tricky to find or monitor. If you want to see if you are flushing extra time and money down the toilet, put some food coloring in the tank. Don’t flush the toilet for a few hours. When you go back, check to see if there’s food coloring in the toilet bowl, If so, you know your toilet is leaking.

The washing machine and dishwasher

  • Visually check your washing machine and dishwasher to ensure they are operating efficiently. Do you see any water damage around the connections? The next time you run either one, take a look and make sure everything is tight and no water is escaping.

The pipes

  • Lastly, but not least – check your pipes for leaks. Problem pipes are prone to freezing or busting in the winter. If you notice any rust or leaks on your pipes, call a plumber. While you’re checking into it, you may want to ask about insulating your pipes before winter to protect them from freezing conditions.

If you have concerns after running through our quick plumbing maintenance guide, you may need a professional plumber. For expert help, call Central Carolina Air Conditioning, Plumbing, & Electrical at 800.461.3010.

 

HVAC filters and COVID-19 – what you need to know

As more information becomes available about COVID-19 and how to prevent or slow its spread, we continue to seek ways to stay safe. First, the recommendation was hand washing and sanitizing. Then, we learned about social distancing. Now, we know that COVID-19 can be spread in the air we breathe. Masks are a helpful defense, but what about HVAC filters and COVID-19? Can our home HVAC systems filter the particles that contain COVID-19?

HVAC Filters and COVID-19

According to the Environmental Protection Association (EPA), we can’t rely on HVAC filters alone to eradicate the risk of COVID-19 contaminating our homes. But, when combined with other measures, like sanitizing surfaces and social distancing, using a high-quality filter can be part of the plan to reduce your overall risk of contracting and spreading COVID-19. When maintained regularly, high-quality filters do help to trap the particles that contain contaminants, like viruses.

So, we know that filters can help in conjunction with other safety precautions. What else can we do to make our air safer to breathe? The EPA offers four specific recommendations to improve the air quality in your home:

Increase Ventilation with Outside Air

  • Open screened windows and doors to let in fresh air, when the outdoor air quality is safe (and if children and pets aren’t at risk)
  • Use bathroom fans (particularly when someone is using the small space)

Improve Natural Ventilation

  • Create cross-ventilation by opening screened doors and windows that are on opposite sides of a space, but not directly in front of each other (again, only if it’s safe for children, pets, and those impacted by poor air quality)
  • Consider using fans to push air out of a window and draw it in through another
  • Opening the highest and lowest windows (especially when they’re on different floors), can increase ventilation

Use your HVAC SystemImage shows air return vent where air is filtered

  • Keep the fan running often – continuously, when possible
  • Filters only process the air when the fan is running
  • Purchase the highest quality filter your system can accommodate

Use a portable air cleaner or air purifier

  • Place in a space where you spend the most time or where a vulnerable person spends time
  • Direct the airflow so that it does not blow directly from one person to another

It’s important to make sure your HVAC system is properly maintained so that it can be part of your COVID-19 safety plan. For information about preventive maintenance, filters, etc. please contact the professionals at Central Carolina Air Conditioning, Plumbing, & Electrical at 800.461.3010.

Summer Energy Efficiency Tips

As the temperatures climb higher and higher, so do our electric bills! If you’re worried about how you can stay comfortable and save energy, check out our summer energy efficiency tips.

The Department of Energy offers some great advice for saving energy in the spring and summer months. We’ve compiled several of our favorites tip to help you – and your wallet – survive summer!

Use Window Coverings

Blinds, curtains, and shades offer more than just decorative appeal and privacy – they can provide insulation and prevent your windows from letting in the sun’s heat. Cellular shades typically have the highest R-value (measure of insulation) of any window coverings and can reduce unwanted heat from the sun through windows by up to 80%! Curtains can be a good choice too, but their insulating power varies widely depending on the fabric type and color.Image of window covering

Blinds are another popular choice. Unlike shades and curtains, blinds allow much more control over the amount of sunlight you let in. Horizontal blinds can even be adjusted to reflect rays onto a light-colored ceiling, which lets you enjoy the light without all the heat. If you don’t want to sacrifice your view, then window films (especially those with UV blockers) are a good option. They may require a little extra care when cleaning, but the benefits may be worth it.

 Keep Hot Air Out

Doors, windows, recessed windows, and fireplace walls are common hot spots (literally) where hot air can enter and your cool air can escape. Weatherstripping and caulk can seal these areas and improve the efficiency of your home, but first you’ll need to identify the trouble spots.

If your windows are in poor condition, you’re likely losing a lot of energy through them. Caulk, weatherstripping, window coverings, and storm panels can all help make your windows more efficient. If you’re in the market for new windows, be sure and look at the ENERGY STAR and NFRC ratings before buying.

Adjust Your Thermostat

If you don’t already have a programmable thermostat, check into upgrading! This type of thermostat lets you automatically set your home’s HVAC system to a warmer temperature when you’re away and cooler when you are home. The closer you can keep the indoor temperature to the outdoor temperature, the lower your electric bill will be. That can be pretty tough when it’s over ninety degrees outside, so try and find a temperature that reduces humidity and provides comfort.

Remember that your thermostat senses the temperature of the room right around it. Avoid putting lamps or electronics next to your thermostat, as they put off heat. The additional heat may confuse your thermostat’s sensors and make your air conditioner run unnecessarily.

These summer energy efficiency tips are a great start. If you need professional help with your home’s energy efficiency, call Central Carolina Air Conditioning, Plumbing, & Electrical at 800.461.3010.

Best Ice for Cold Drinks

Entertaining family and friends is a fun way to spend the season, and creative and cold drinks make any party festive. Is your ice maker in working order? Is it serving what you want in your glass? Just as there are dozens of decisions to make when buying a refrigerator, now there are decisions for cold beverage lovers to make when it comes to the shape of ice they prefer! What’s the best ice for cold drinks?

Here’s a look at some of the most popular options out there.

Pellet ice (crushed ice)

This ice is popular for an icy soda. It melts quickly, so it’s best for those who don’t mind a little water dilution in their drinks. Many refrigerator-installed ice makers produce these cubes which are round on one side and flat on the other. Did you know the shape is also designed to prevent splashing when liquid is poured on top of it? Pretty smart!

Two cold beverages in glasses with cubed ice

 

Large clear cubes

Due to their larger size, these slow melting cubes are perfect for straight liquid drinks like whiskey. They create a bubble-free ice cube that is tricky to produce and requires a specific mold.

Ice rods

Special ice trays are made to create these cylindrical shaped pieces, and are a very popular way to keep water bottle water cold.

Crescent cubes

These cubes are found mostly in portable ice makers or under-the-counter machines. It’s called “gourmet ice,” and is round and hollow in the middle.


Types of Ice Makers

For people who like to entertain or that have several people in the house who are into fitness or spend time outdoors with multiple ice-filled water bottles each day, under-the-counter ice machines might be the best choice. Because of all the gadgets that come in modern refrigerators, built-in ice makers tend to take a back seat. They just can’t keep up with high demand. But, if you do go with an under the counter machine, you will need a professional plumber to hook up your machine.

If you decide the shape of ice and type of machine is one you don’t have, make your purchase and make the water connection you need to make it happen. Connecting your water line should be a task completed by an expert to make sure your appliance doesn’t leak. It’s really a matter of opinion when it comes to the best ice for cold drinks.

Whether you are upgrading to a refrigerator with an ice maker that fits your needs, need help with the malfunctioning one you have or want to install an under counter model, contact a professional to get the job done right. Call Central Carolina Air Conditioning, Plumbing, & Electrical at 800.461.3010 for assistance from a professional plumber.

7 Most Common Plumbing Problems

Plumbing problems often come with home ownership. Some problems come with aging fixtures or normal wear and tear, but other problems may be caused by how the systems are used or maintained. Let’s take a look at the seven most common plumbing problems.

1.       Weak water pressure

Weak water pressure can challenge any plumbing system. It’s usually a sign of a bigger problem like hidden water leaks, drain or sewer clogs, cracked or backed up sewer lines, or pipe corrosion.

2.       Dripping faucets

Dripping faucets are wasteful, annoying and costly. Sometimes, these drips can be the result of a worn-out washer, which is easy to replace. Other times; however, corrosion or poorly installed faucets can be the problem.

3.       Leaking pipesWoman looks frustrated by leaking pipe under her kitchen sink

Leaking pipes are the result of one of many sorts of problems, including: corrosion, clogs,  damage to pipe joints, excessive water pressure or cracked seals or pipes.

No matter what’s the cause, this common plumbing problem needs attention fast! Leaving leaking pipes ignored only creates more damage, therefore, causing trouble for your plumbing system and to your home itself.

4.       Clogged or slow drains

Drainage problems can cause health hazards and major plumbing disasters if left undone. In general, one slow or clogged drain in the home means the problem is localized to that area. Typically, these clogs are the result of soap or hair, for instance, and other build-up over time. Routine drain cleaning can solve this problem. Multiple slow or clogged drains typically mean you are dealing with sewer line problems.

5.       Water heater problems

Hot water is necessary in every home, so when water heaters can’t work properly, then homeowners can be dealing with a crisis. Usually, when water heaters have problems they are caused by issues like loose or broken electrical connections, improper water heater installation, heating element issues, or corrosion buildup in systems.

6.       Running Toilets

Running toilets may waste up to 200 gallons of water per day! In most cases, the issues that cause running toilets include: corroded toilet handles, refill tube problems, improperly sized flapper chains or worn out seals or valves.

7.       Sump Pump Failure

This plumbing issue can be related to a problem with the unit or an outside issue. In most cases, sump pump failures include aging (sump pumps around 10 years old or more), clogged discharge pipes, stuck switches, a large amount of water, like after a heavy rain storm, or improper installation.

Sometimes the most common plumbing problems can still be too big for a DIY homeowner to handle. For help from a professional plumber, call Central Carolina Air Conditioning, Plumbing, & Electrical at 800.461.3010.