Pros and Cons of Replacing Original Windows

If you are the owner of a home built before 1960, you’ve probably considered energy efficiency and the pros and cons of replacing original windows. A big challenge is that all homes are different and the only way to really measure savings with new windows is to replace or repair them and compare energy costs.  Another challenge is the simple fact that a typical 2,000 square foot home built before 1960 could have as many as 22-25 windows. The investment factor is significant.

Window Restoration

Many people who buy older homes do so for historic value, the romance of old architecture, and the quality of craftsmanship. Most original windows were made with quality hardwood frames with panes of glass sealed into the grid with glaze. Over time, the hard putty-like glaze starts to wear away and the weather-tight seal is compromised. Re-glazing is the technique of repairing windows with new seals and sometimes new glass and frames, depending on the extent of the damage. It’s considered an art form and can be expensive and time consuming. If your home has historical value or is located in a neighborhood that has been designated by the municipality for

preservation, re-glazing the original windows might be the best option or even the only option.  Grant funding is sometimes available to homeowners in these areas.

Energy Efficiency

Energy efficiency can be a major issue with old windows, particularly those that weren’t maintained properly. Storm windows provide a barrier from the elements, but nothing compares to the insulation of vinyl replacement windows. The expense of replacement can be considerable because homes built before air conditioning were designed with more windows to promote airflow during the summer. Long-term, restoring or replacing original windows will lower heating and cooling costs, and possibly extend the life of your HVAC unit.

To learn more about lowering your heating and cooling costs, contact Central Carolina Air Conditioning at 1.800.461.3010.