An Unresponsive Furnace

Your furnace is one of the most important parts of your home and one of the most costly to repair. So what do you do when it appears to be broken?

If your furnace isn’t working, first try simply changing the filter. Often this is the issue. (This should be done at least once every few months– more often if you have allergies/asthma.)

You’ll also want to see if there is an indicator light on the furnace circuit board. If you see it and it is flashing, look for the chart that corresponds to it. This will tell you what is wrong.

Next, try cycling the power by turning the power off for five minutes and then turning it back on, either at the breaker or using the on-off switch on the furnace. This will reset the alarms in the system. You’ll turn the thermostat on and see if the system turns on. You’ll see the hot surface ignitor start to glow or hear the clicking of the spark ignitor. If the ignitor is not working, the gas valve will not stay open until your replace the ignitor.

Also, check that the gas did not accidentally get turned off.

Do not try to make any major repairs on your own, as this can void your warranty. Furthermore, it is always best to be on the safe side and call a professional if you are not comfortable with what you are doing.

You should already have a professional come twice a year to inspect and clean your HVAC system. Regular servicing will prevent the majority of problems from becoming huge!

###

Have a concern with your electrical, plumbing or air conditioning? Central Carolina Air Conditioning, Plumbing and Electrical is here to help! We offer 24 hour emergency service 7 days a week!  Give us a call! 1-800-461-3010 to speak with our customer service agents that can answer your questions or schedule an appointment!

 

 

Furnace Efficiency Ratings

 

UnknownDid you know that the efficiency rating for your heating system will help you figure out how much it will cost you to heat your home? A higher rating is ideal — it means that a greater amount of heat is provided for the amount of energy used.

The Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE) rating indicates how much heat the furnace produces compared to the amount of energy required to produce the heat. For example, if a furnace is rated at 80 percent AFUE, 20 percent of the energy used is lost, and 80 percent actually becomes heat.

By finding out this information you can decide if it may be time to upgrade your system. Contact the manufacturer or search on their website to find your model.

Here is how the efficiency ratings for systems break down:

  • 56-70% efficiency (typically older models)
  • 80-83% AFUE- mid-efficiency
  • 90-98.5 AFUE- high-efficiency

Keep in mind that the AFUE rating does not account for potential heat loss through duct work. Ducts can lose a lot of heating efficiency.

High-efficiency furnaces use two heat exchangers. Condensing units remove water from exhaust gas and then send the gas through a second exchanger. The combustion units are sealed. Condensing furnaces are generally about 10 percent higher in efficiency ratings than non-condensing units. These systems are more expensive initially, but you can save a great deal of money over the long term in fuel costs. An HVAC professional can help you decide what is best for your home and lifestyle.

Have a concern with your electrical, plumbing or air conditioning? Central Carolina Air Conditioning, Plumbing and Electrical is here to help! We offer 24 hour emergency service 7 days a week!  Give us a call! 1-800-461-3010 to speak with our customer service agents that can answer your questions or schedule an appointment!

Winter Warning: Carbon Monoxide in Your Home

 
Many of us are already turning on the heat—and this is just the beginning of the fall and winter season. When it’s cold outside and your bills start skyrocketing, all you want to do is warm up your house. While it can be tempting to come up with alternative heating solutions, some ideas you may consider can be unsafe.

Though an open flame has obvious safety concerns, carbon monoxide exposure has its own dangers. Persistent carbon monoxide exposure can actually cause memory loss, severe lung injury, brain damage and even death. You can never be too safe when dealing with a substance that can be so dangerous. So how do you keep your house safe?

  • detectorGrills, generators, and any burning devices that run on gasoline, propane, natural gas or charcoal should not be used inside the house — not even in the garage or basement, or an area that is only partially enclosed.
  • Do not burn anything in a stove or a fireplace that is not vented.
  • A common cause of winter fires — as well as carbon monoxide poisoning — is heating your home with a gas oven. This is very unsafe and should not be done.
  • If you use a space heater, it should be properly vented while in use, according to the manufacturer’s specifications.
  • Do not run a car or truck engine inside the garage that is attached to your house. This is unsafe even if you have left the door open.
  • Make sure to have carbon monoxide detectors on every level of your home and just outside of any sleeping areas.
  • If your carbon monoxide alarm goes off, you’ll want to move quickly outside and call 911.
  • Even if an alarm doesn’t go off, if for some reason you suspect carbon monoxide poisoning and are feeling dizzy, light-headed, or nauseous, get medical help quickly.

Have a concern with your electrical, plumbing or air conditioning? Central Carolina Air Conditioning, Plumbing and Electrical is here to help! We offer 24 hour emergency service 7 days a week!  Give us a call! 1-800-461-3010 to speak with our customer service agents that can answer your questions or schedule an appointment!

It's Humidifier Season

file000735477110

Now that we’re deep into fall and winter is just around the corner, it’s time to start thinking about humidifiers for your home.

Not only can dry air lead to dry skin, lips eyes and sinuses, but it can also make your symptoms worse when you’re sick and create more problems if you have respiratory issues. Dry air is also not good for your wood flooring and furnishings.

Typically, a good humidity level will be between 30 and 50 percent. If it is very cold outside, the level should be about 30 percent. If it’s not as cold, it can be closer to 50 percent. Some humidifiers will measure the levels in a room.

Many homeowners use small humidifiers in several rooms in the house, especially the bedrooms. Usually these can run up to 24 hours or so before needing to be refilled. If you need more moisture for a larger area, you can consider console humidifiers or whole house humidifiers.

Different types include cool mist, warm mist, and ultrasonic humidifiers. Cool mist versions put out a room-temperature mist and are a good choice for the kids’ rooms because there isn’t a risk of them getting hurt from mist that is too hot. Warm mist versions may use a bit more electricity to warm the water, but may also put out cleaner mist because the heating process kills germs. Ultrasonic versions come in both warm mist and cool mist types, and are very quiet.

If you’re using an older humidifier, keep in mind that a moldy, bacteria-filled humidifier will only make things worse. Some are harder to see into than others, and if you haven’t properly maintained yours, it may be a good idea to get a new one. To keep yours clean, use distilled water and clean it every few days by rinsing it out, then rinsing with vinegar or hydrogen peroxide. Empty it out as soon as it is no longer being used.

Have a concern with your electrical, plumbing or air conditioning? Central Carolina Air Conditioning, Plumbing and Electrical is here to help! We offer 24 hour emergency service 7 days a week!  Give us a call! 1-800-461-3010 to speak with our customer service agents that can answer your questions or schedule an appointment!