Winterize Your Sprinkler System

 

 

images-3Did you know that water can remain in your irrigation system even after you’ve drained it? If that’s the case for your system, that means it could potentially freeze and expand during the cold winter months, then crack the PVC piping. Even with the more flexible polyethylene pipe, it can still expand under pressure and water inside can rupture the pipe walls.

To avoid this happening, implement the winterizing techniques like those listed below. If you don’t know what type of system you have its best to use the blowout method.

Manual Method and Automatic Method: 

  • If manual valves are at the end and low points of the irrigation piping, use the manual drain method. Shut off the irrigation water supply and open all the manual drain valves.
  • If automatic drain valves are at the end and low points of the irrigation piping, use the automatic drain method. Shut off the irrigation water supply (in the basement) and activate a station to relieve the system pressure.
  • In both methods, after the water has drained, open the boiler drain valve (or the drain cap on the stop and waste valve) and drain all the water that remains. Open the test cocks on the backflow device. If your sprinklers have check valves, pull up on the sprinklers to let water drain out of the bottom of the sprinkler body. When all the water has drained out, close the drain valves.

Blow Out Method: 

This method involves blowing out an irrigation system with compressed air. It is best to hire a professional to perform this type of winterization method as it takes particular knowledge as well as stringent safety precautions.

Have a concern with your electrical, plumbing or air conditioning? Central Carolina Air Conditioning, Plumbing and Electrical is here to help! We offer 24 hour emergency service 7 days a week!  Give us a call! 1-800-461-3010 to speak with our customer service agents that can answer your questions or schedule an appointment!

Hot Tubs for Cold Winter Months 

 

During the cold months of winter,images the idea of soaking in a steamy hot tub sounds like a dream. Getting one for your home, though, comes with some expenses and takes preparation. If you’re thinking about splurging on this big-ticket item this holiday season, here is what you should know:

You’ll want to consider where you’d like to put the hot tub and what type you’d like, as some are heavier than others and may require more support than currently exists in that location. Furthermore, the hot tub will need to be at least 10 feet away from overhead power lines and 5 feet from the spa panel.

You will need to install a breaker in your electrical control box. Keep in mind that sometimes warranties are voided if a professional electrician does not install the electrical circuit. Often it also needs to be approved by a building inspector.

Prepare for hot water costs—on average, an electric hot tub uses about 2,500 kWh per year. What does that mean? Well, it’s enough to run more than six refrigerators for about a year. Yikes! So, you’ll want to make sure you have an energy-efficient cover and that it is in good condition. When shopping for a hot tub, look for one that has plenty of insulation and uses an efficient variable speed pump or two-pump system.

Most hot tubs are self-contained, so plumbing won’t be as difficult as the electrical work.

Overall, you’re looking at a project that will cost you several thousand dollars, but in the end, if done correctly, can be a great addition to your home.

Have a concern with your electrical, plumbing or air conditioning? Central Carolina Air Conditioning, Plumbing and Electrical is here to help! We offer 24-hour emergency service 7 days a week!  Give us a call! 1-800-461-3010 to speak with our customer service agents that can answer your questions or schedule an appointment!